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Eur J Appl Physiol., 2008; 103(4): 441-8, PMID: 18392845

The rate of muscle temperature increase during acute whole-body vibration exercise

Jahr: 2008

Cochrane DJ, Stannard SR, Sargeant AJ, Rittweger J
Sport Management and Coaching, Department of Management, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, New Zealand, D.Cochrane@massey.ac.nz.

Abstract

This study compared the rate of muscle temperature (T (m)) increase during acute whole-body vibration (WBV), to that of stationary cycling and passive warm-up. Additionally we wanted to determine if the purported increase in counter-movement jump and peak power cycling from acute WBV could be explained by changes in muscle temperature. Eight active participants volunteered for the study, which involved a rest period of 30 min to collect baseline measures of muscle, core, skin temperature, heart rate (HR), and thermal leg sensation (TLS), which was followed by three vertical jumps and 5 s maximal cycle performance test. A second rest period of 40 min was enforced followed by the intervention and performance tests. The change in T (m) elicited during cycling was matched in the hot bath and WBV interventions. Therefore cycling was performed first, proceeded by, in a random order of hot bath and acute WBV. The rate of T (m) was significantly greater (P < 0.001) during acute WBV (0.30 degrees C min(-1)) compared to cycle (0.15 degrees C min(-1)) and hot bath (0.09 degrees C min(-1)) however there was no difference between the cycle and hot bath, and the metabolic rate was the same in cycling and WBV (19 mL kg(-1) min(-1)). All three interventions showed a significant (P < 0.001) increase in countermovement jump peak power and height. For the 5 s maximal cycle test (MIC) there were no significant differences in peak power between the three interventions. In conclusion, acute WBV elevates T (m) more quickly than traditional forms of cycling and passive warm-up. Given that all three warm-up methods yielded the same increase in peak power output, we propose that the main effect is caused by the increase in T (m).

Schlagworte: Muscle Temperature Power
GID: 1310; Letzte Änderung: 05.05.2008