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J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact, 2018; 18(1): 9-17, PMID: 29504574

Calf muscle density is independently associated with physical function in overweight and obese older adults.

Jahr: 2018

Scott D, Shore-Lorenti C, McMillan LB, Mesinovic J, Clark RA, Hayes A, Sanders KM, Duque G, Ebeling PR
Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether associations of calf muscle density with physical function are independent of other determinants of functional decline in overweight and obese older adults. METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study of 85 community-dwelling overweight and obese adults (mean+/-SD age 62.8+/-7.9 years; BMI 32.3+/-6.1 kg/m2; 58% women). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography assessed mid-calf muscle density (66% tibial length) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry determined visceral fat area. Fasting glucose, Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analysed. Physical function assessments included hand grip and knee extension strength, balance path length (computerised posturography), stair climb test, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and self-reported falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale; M-FES). RESULTS: Visceral fat area, not muscle density, was independently associated with CRP and fasting glucose (B=0.025; 95% CI 0.009-0.042 and B=0.009; 0.001-0.017, respectively). Nevertheless, higher muscle density was independently associated with lower path length and stair climb time, and higher SPPB and M-FES scores (all P0.05). Visceral fat area, fasting glucose and CRP did not mediate these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Higher calf muscle density predicts better physical function in overweight and obese older adults independent of insulin resistance, visceral adiposity or inflammation.

GID: 4711; Letzte Änderung: 02.07.2018